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Gaelic names of beasts (Mammalia), birds, fishes, insects, reptiles, etc. in two parts : I. Gaelic-English.--II. English-Gaelic by Alexander Robert Forbes

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Published by Oliver and Boyd [etc.] in Edinburgh .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Animals -- Nomenclature (Popular),
  • Scottish Gaelic language -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc.,
  • English language -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc.,
  • Folklore, Celtic.,
  • Animals -- Folklore.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementPart I. contains Gaelic names or terms for each of the above, with English meanings. Part II. Contains all the English names for which Gaelic is given in Part I., with Gaelic, other English names, etymology, Celtic lore, prose, poetry, and proverbs referring to each, thereto attached. All new brought together for the first time by Alexander Robert Forbes
GenreNomenclature (Popular), Glossaries, vocabularies, etc.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQL355 .F6
The Physical Object
Paginationxx, 424 p.
Number of Pages424
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24179939M
LC Control Number36011626
OCLC/WorldCa62438546

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Gaelic was a term used to refer to any of the Goidelic languages, which included Irish, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx. The travelling freak show Circus Arcanus featured Nigelle le Narcissique, a purported member of the species Homo Amphibia, who was billed as "freakishly devour[ing]" her own tail while singing Gaelic folk songs. The Irish for beast is beithíoch. Find more Irish words at !   List of Creatures in Scottish and Gaelic Folklore. Supernatural Creatures in Scottish Folklore this is a list of them. There are many supernatural creatures to be found in Scottish/Gaelic folklore, Scotland has a rich Culture going back over 2, years. Gaelic Names of Beasts (Mammalia), Birds, Fishes, Insects, Reptiles, Etc: In Two Parts: I. Gaelic-EnglishII. English-Gaelic [ ] [Alexander Robert Forbes] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Originally published in This volume from the Cornell University Library's print collections was scanned on an APT BookScan and converted to JPG format by .

  Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Gaelic names of beasts (Mammalia), birds, fishes, insects, reptiles, etc. in two parts by Alexander Robert Forbes, , Oliver and Boyd edition, in EnglishPages: TY - BOOK TI - Gaelic names of beasts (Mammalia), birds, fishes, insects, reptiles, etc. in two parts: 1. Gaelic-English.- 2. English-Gaelic. Part 1. contains Gaelic names or terms for each of the above, with English meanings. beast - translation to Irish Gaelic and Irish Gaelic audio pronunciation of translations: See more in New English-Irish Dictionary from Foras na Gaeilge. beast translation in English-Scottish Gaelic dictionary. Showing page 1. Found 0 sentences matching phrase "beast".Found in 0 ms.

The Gaelic Names of Beasts collects together recorded names for mammals, birds, fishes, insects and reptiles in Irish, Scots Gaelic and Manx from a variety of sources including oral collections, early manuscripts and was first published in by Alexander Robert Forbes (). Forbes was born on Skye, off Scotland’s west coast and studied law in Edinburgh . This list of Scottish Gaelic given names shows Scottish Gaelic given names beside their English language equivalent. In some cases, the equivalent can be a cognate, in other cases it may be an Anglicised spelling derived from the Gaelic name, or in other cases it can be an etymologically unrelated name.. List of feminine Scottish Gaelic and English names A.   In the Book of Lecan old Irish Gaelic words for sheep are "Cetnat" and "Cit"; sheep, when gathered by a dog into a corner are described in Aran Irish Gaelic as "ta na caoraigh sainnighthe aig an madadh," "the sheep are gathered in a corner by (at) the dog," "sainne" meaning a : Alexander Robert Forbes.   During storms the marool can be heard singing wildly with joy when a ship capsizes. Marool is only one of a number of names that have been applied to the anglerfish or monkfish. References. Forbes, A. R. () Gaelic Names of Beasts (Mammalia), Birds, Fishes, Insects, Reptiles, Etc. Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh.